• Out of Stock
    This painting tells the dreaming story of how the herds of dugong in Moreton bay came to be.  A bitten bird netted a dugong at Minjerribah.  His friends were excited for the feast but the bitten wanted to play a joke on them.  The bitten and his friends all got in their canoes, with the yungan towing behind.  The bitten went from Minjerribah, to Kanaipa (Russell Island), Coochiemudlo, to Jercooroobah (Peel) to Tanggeera (Green Island), Noogoon (St Helena).  All the time his friends waiting for the feast but instead the bitten said we will eat at the next island.  Then finally the bitten said we’ll eat at Bungumba (Mud island).  At Bumgumba while they were eating, an old Joondahl (woman) could hear them and smell the feast.  She wanted to steal all the meat for herself.  The group saw this and got into their canoes to flee with the yungan meat.   The old woman got angry and hit the water making waves and they all fell out of their canoes along with the cut up dugong meat with each piece of meat then turned into a yungan.
  • Fire Balls

    $860.00
    Jo Campbell
    Acrylic on stretched canvas
    120 x 30cm x 2cm
  • Out of Stock
    The waters of Quandamooka sea country are so clear with many beautiful shades of blue. This painting shows Pulan Pulan (Amity) and crystal clear waters around Moor-gumpin (Moreton Island). In this painting you’ll see many shades of blue showing the South Passage bar with it’s chan-nels , gutters and sand banks. For generations our people have fished these waters, being caretakers of the land and sea. Looking after country, with country looking after us we lived in harmony for thousands of years. 61wx91hx4d (cm)
  • Out of Stock
    The sea levels were said to have risin in Moreton bay approximately 12 thousand years ago. Our ancestors were witness to this occurancance as were other tribes along the coastline of Australia who also have their dreaming stories that tell of this same event. This painting depicts our dreaming story about how Moreton Bay filled with water and how the earth in the area got it's red colour. Moreton bay was not always filled with water but was once a land area with swamps. The Quandamooka people roamed this entire area from Stradbroke, Moreton to Wynnum, Cleveland to the south as far as the mouth of the Logan river. In the dreamtime there was a battle over land, air and sea rights between the goanna, hawk and dolphin. They all wanted to be boss. The goanna had a spear. The hawk swooped down and stole it spearing the dolphin on top of his head. That is how the dolphin got his blow hole and out of that hole spilled blood and water. The blood covered the land in and around Moreton Bay turning it red and the water filled Moreton bay. The whale did not like all the fighting so he took off down south but he returns every year and meets up with his old bunji (friend) the dolphin as he heads further north. That's why you see the dolphins near the whales during the annual whale migration. 61wx91hx4d (cm)
  • Out of Stock
    Kroomba djara Quandamooka djagan (Big land Quandamooka Country)
  • Lemon Myrtle

    $3,700.00
    Jo Campbell
    Acrylic on un-stretched canvas
    120 x 120cm
  • Mullet Run

    $1,100.00
    Jo Campbell
    Acrylic on flat un-stretched canvas
    120 x 30cm
  • Alicia Close
    Acrylic on Stretched Canvas
    77 x 77 x 4cm
  • Out of Stock
    This painting represent the nets traditionally used by Quandamooka people to catch Yungan (dugong). The lines of dots are the strong nets the yungan were caught with which were made from the inside bark of a scrub vine called nannam in our traditional Jandai language. Huge herds of yungan once fed along the western shore of Moregumpin (Moreton Is) along through to Goompi (Dunwich). 61wx91hx4d (cm)
  • Rock Pools ll

    $4,000.00
    Jo Campbell
    Acrylic on stretched canvas
    194 x 91 cm
  • Alicia Close
    Acrylic on Stretched Canvas
    76 x 61 x 4cm